Lindsay

Lindsay is essentially an audio drama fan fiction of the 1998 film “The Parent Trap” with a supernatural twist and that is easily the best summary I can offer without going into too much detail. It comes from, Waks On Waks Off Productions and is what I can only assume is their first show, and from what I could garner from this, hopefully not their last.

Lindsay is essentially an audio drama fan fiction of the 1998 film “The Parent Trap” with a supernatural twist and that is easily the best summary I can offer without going into too much detail. It comes from, Waks On Waks Off Productions and is what I can only assume is their first show, and from what I could garner from this, hopefully not their last.

Lindsay is an easy listen at a mere six episodes with most not being longer than fifteen minutes and yet it manages to pack a lot of content and intrigue in its brief run time. Even the first episode had my jaw to the floor as the narrator shoots witty comebacks at a gross man she just met and the dialogue just rolls into the next scene with a sort of fluidness you almost forget that this all started with a moody monologue typical for the genre.

Given the third episode is in the listing is called “Private Pussy”, I wasn’t surprised at the number of teeth Lindsay has in its mouth, and just how many were barred from day one. A very take no prisoners kind of approach that I’ve found in things like Rover Red and SAYER but with more subtle takes at the flimsiness of reality and the supernatural.

Above all Lindsay is just really funny and ballsy, and the small amount of episodes keep’s the momentum rolling the whole time. Though the main character has quite a mouth on her and she completely owns her role, she’s easily the best part and an amazing vehicle to see the lens of this world through.

It’s shows like this that really make me appreciate things like effective sound design, and all the difference it makes for letting scenes transition. The way the music and the voice acting blends together so fluidly, no hiccups or awkward cuts and yet they still keep the run time at a brief and breathable pace.

Some scenes might rub people the wrong way, and if that’s a plus or minus to the overall tone of the narrative, well that’s up for debate. It’s so honest and mature about topics of childhood innocence and the corruption of fame you’d think they were pulling some scenes off exclusively to amp up the edge, but no matter how off putting, the execution makes the surreal moments more surreal, and really strengthens the unhealthy mentalities of the small cast of characters.

There are one or two elements introduced in the beginning that we don’t get much elaboration on, or isn’t pushed as much use as it could have been, but that might just be the small amount of episodes to blame for that. Though I think the short length is a plus in certain ways, it does come at the risk of their being just a little less of Lindsay to enjoy.

Lindsay is amazingly polished with a solid narrative and a lot of wit and personality to a story that proves to be a compelling modern noir. It’s everything I didn’t expect and more, and ended up being all the things I could possibly seek in a satisfying story.

In the end, Lindsay is something you can breeze through in a day while being deeply invested in an overarching plot. You get a lot of engaging content for so little episodes and I look forward to a possible sequel about the inside story of “Mean Girls”.